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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
estimates. major manufacturers in japan say business sentiment is getting worse. that's according to the latest quarterly report by the country's central bank. the bank of japan released on friday it's quarterly survey of short-term business confidence. nearly 11,000 companies up were covered byhe poll. e headline index stood at minus 12, down 9 points from the previous survey in september. it also records two consecutive quarters of worsening sentiment. the main factor for the decline is poor exports of auto and other economies due to the european downturn and cooling ties with china. another negative factor is the drop in domestic car sales because state subsidies for buyers of fuel efficient cars expired in september. for the nonmanufacturing sector the sentiment index was down by four points from the previous surv survey. looking aahead the to the next three months, major manufacturers expect a slight improvement as they hope the u.s. and chinese economies recovery. they're concerned that cooling consumer sentiment will persist. japanese shoppers are spends less, and that's go
-backed candidate to lead it. >> gentlemen, behave. >> japan is facing a new general election. >> more on that in a few minutes. first, these other stories making news. japan has accused china of violating its airspace after a chinese government plane was spotted over a group of disputed islands in the east china sea. japan this past fighter jets and launched an official complaint with -- japan dispatched fighter jets and launched an official complaint. the islands are claimed by both japan and beijing. >> palin's prime minister has been charged with murder. the charges relate to the death -- thailand's prime minister has been charged with primer. the charges relate to the death of a tax dry -- taxi driver. >> the south pacific island nation of samoa has been lashed by a cyclone. the storm and damaged buildings, uprooted trees, and caused flooding. officials have declared a state of emergency. no injuries have been reported. >> an autopsy has confirmed that the prisoners committed suicide after being caught up in a prank phone call -- that a british nurse committed suicide after being
>>> digging deeper. the search goes on for possible active faults beneath japan's nuclear plants. they could lead to permanent shutdown of several reactors. welcome to nhk world "newsline." inspectors from japan's nuclear regulation authority said a new nuclear power plan in the northern japan may be sitting on active seismic faults. a team of five experts concluded their two-day inspection at the higashidori plant in aomori prefecture. they concentrated on two faults in the compound. official from the plant's operator told the power company that a shift in the strata was caused by ground water. they say it wasn't the result of an active fault. investigators say they cannot rule out the possibility that the two faults are active. they say they will be able to come to a finding without additional surveys. the nuclear regulation authority says all members of the team share the same view. he says there's evidence that the faults have moved. officials with the authority will meet to discuss the matter next thursday. the electric plant say the faults are not located directly beneath t
avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it appears ta stronger services may be weaker on the manufacturing relative to expectations, at least, b
of earthquake. we're designing for an 8.0 and that's not what happened in japan in 2011. the earthquake that hit japan in 2011 was not what they were designing for and all the assumptions went out the window so that's food for thought. >> thank you. mr. angelus. >> at verizon wireless we try to do it day in and day out to avoid interruption in services. we try to put all this in place but in the event they do happen, we have those redundant systems i discussed earlier. weak route traffic from one side to another or from one switch to another and we test regularly to make sure they occur. and this is transparent to our customers. calls are being routed to another switch during these cross over tests. we have actually fleet of portable cell sites, these are cells that are on trucks or in trailers that are deployed, that actually are available within a market so we can deploy them in the cases of emergency so if the cet site actually goes out of service, we can deploy a september temporary cell site. we have these systems available for our emergency departments so if they need coverage
u.s. s. reagan was in japan after their earthquake, there were a couple petty officers who had undergone that training were sent ashore in japan to assist in some of the urban search and rescue training. so, it was real world application. before i bring the next welcomer up, i have some administrative remarks. there are rest rooms here. and today i want to make sure you know it's back behind those screens for people that weren't here yesterday. and, of course, there's coffee there. this is a busy week and a busy weekend, and it's a core i -- choreography with all the ship movements. i can't let it go further without thanking monique moyer for what she and her folks have done to make this such a wonderful fleet week. (applause) >> our next welcomer, and this has really been exciting for me because i didn't think it would happen, but it came last year and he's become a great supporter and he happens to be the supervisor where most of the activities are taking place in the city. but he's also the president of the board of supervisors. i'd like you to welcome david chiu. (applause
, then japan next year led next year with 8.9, but it's a lot, a big amount of energy was released in just 3 1/2 minutes. usually that things happen at night. i don't know why, but it always happen at night. so we are leading on february 27 at 3.24 and you can see in light blue the time when the first wave arrived the coast because the epicenter was so close to the coast. so it's no more than 10 minutes and at the same time the waves start moving through the pacific ocean and in 21 hours it hits the coast of hawaii. so everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediately we have different waves. the high of that wave was at about 50 meters but one hour after that in one place we start having waves of 30 meters. a happened in the island of guata after that, 7:00 in the morning we are still having different waves at different places in the coast arriving every 30 minutes and the average high was about 15 meters, which is a lot. another massive effect was that the south american
the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintaining the freedom of th
a hundred species from japan and china and bamboo and native plants. >> they're trimmed to a human scale so you relate to them on a human level. >> this is one of my favorite sections and you can see the goarnlrous maples by the bamboo back drop and especially beautiful in the fall when the leaves start changing colors. just around the corner from maple lane this little garden is called a zen garden, a dry landscape garden and constructed here in 1953. this was originally designed by zen monks for the ground. their main purpose was to create a trairchg tranquil setting for the monks. this is no ordinary bridge. it's made of redwood, oak and cedar. the high arch style makes it easy to pass under. the newly refurbished tea house is in the center of the gard scpen a great place to eat and chill as you take in the view of the garden. if you wish you can experience the rich cultural tradition that celebrates the preparation of green tea or matcha and your host dressed in the ceremony will demonstrate how to clean the utensils and receive and drink tea with ancient japanese customs. the ar
't done much. sell me on this security company. >> it is the largest electronic security business in japan. they monitor security alarms and firearms. it is a 60% market share of that business. it produces a very stable cash flow from its subscribers which has grown a little bit over time. japan has been a deflationary environment. liz: the ticker symbol, this is an american depository received trade. >> we have a local japanese share. liz: people could play it that way. here is the one year picture. it is of 14% over the past year. >> is a very dominant business. it has very healthy balance sheet with net cash and unlike many japanese businesses with the stereotype you often hear about japanese companies floating cash or being bad for shareholders, it has a regular dividend and bought back some stocks. liz: two click on names, a european conglomerate, you like that and the u.s. equity play is bank of new york mellon. >> bank of new york, very interesting company, not really a bank in the sense that they do very little risk taking. roughly 80% of its income is from related businesses. liz:
in a number of european, in japan and a number of other locations we have had in japan an individual went in with a knife and started stabbing people. this was somebody with a severe mental illness. we don't know what we have here. we don't know if in fact the principal was a victim of this believed shooter. we don't zero if this is something that related to the school. something outside of the school. but there seems to be a profile when we see most of these shootings, though, chris, it's someone who's angry, who's frustrated, who's rageful and who blames others for problems that they have in life and unfortunately, believe that they have almost a right to go and take out their anger and frustration and rage against another person. years ago we thought children they needed to get under their desks and hide because we were afraid of a nuclear threat from russia. now we have to teach children in kindergarten and first grade what they have to do if a shooter come into their school. this is an anomaly, but if this happens more than -- >> we're just hearing from wnbc's jonathan dietz, hess re
cardiac arrests in japan and found 46% of the hands only group were alive one month later compared to 40% with traditional cpr and hands only cpr led to 41% having good brain function compared to 33% with the traditional cpr. cpr keeps blood flowing to the heart and brain but many by standers are afraid to jump in. the hope is that more people know they can do hands only, they will be less likely to be hands off. >> now the american heart association is talking about hands only cpr so there should be no hesitation. >> reporter: hands only cpr is easy to do. and if you forget the rhythm, just sing. >> ha, ha, ha, staying alive, staying alive... >> reporter: now, stayin' alive is the equivalent of 100 beats per minute and that makes it ideal for hands only cpr. if you aren't a fan of the bee gees, you can also use queen's another one bites the dust which is also 100 beats per minute. kim mulvihill, cbs 5. ,, ,,,,,, ♪ secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health
japan and nobody goes on the street and says open the doors. here's the saddest thing i've ever seen in my life. >> everybody only gets two minutes. if you could finish your thought, that would be great. >> two minutes? i've been here 57 years, lady. you say valley will be here monday and people are out sick. you are not respecting the sbreg integrity of the folks already there. maybe you ought to just stop and let us grow and flow. >> thank you, next speaker. >> good afternoon, supervisors, my name is jake crafford. if you look at the fillmore district and compare it to divisidero and vezation valley, you are having a lot of power shaping our neighborhood deciding what businesses go into the retail spaces, what organizations come to service our community. in the last year and a half there's literally been two meetings in our neighborhood regarding the $800,000, two meetings, and one of the things we agreed to with the mayor's office when they came in, they would have monthly meetings and they would have it monthly, that way when you have a important topic the community has an
the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the world a better place. it made it a little less dangerous than it is today simply because we took a country that was predominately anti-american
complications. look at japan. who knew? we plan for one thing and then you have the cascading effect. we've talked a lot about the secondary and tertiary effects of disaster. it makes it more complicated but at the end of the day we have to be more resilient. so that's the take away. every single one of us, whether you are a nurse, in the fire department, dod or emergency management to help make our system a little bit more resilient, a little bit better. i have a laundry list of ideas if anybody wants to come help, i tell you. but there we are. what we've done since we've been back because i really wanted to do something productive, lewis has been such a great partner, we carried that partnership on. we've gone, we've truly taken, gone around the bend here and gone from talk to action with this partnership. one of the things, one of the few things we really could do was help to be a pipeline to supplies because like i said, they were running low on some things. their feeding centers were starting to shut down, they were running out of dry goods. so we set up, anybody who is familiar
and protest the fact they wanted to have a nuclear power plant sitting next to an earthquake fault. in japan i think the conversation around nuclear power is shifting again and there are challenges to it and this is not new. this conversation has been around forever and that is pg&e and nuclear power and all of that and here we are in 2012 still having the conversation, so i mean i wouldn't under estimate again the type of opposition, however subtle or not, that this program is going to have to conwith. that's why it's critical how we accurately inform people in the city around the value of this program. >> thank you commissioner olague. president carter also wore a button down sweater when he made that statement. >> did he? >> it's important to note that ronald regan removed those solar panels from the white house. i am unclear on the agenda and on ours it doesn't mention any possible action item, but on the document for the public utilities commission it does and i think we want to make sure we're either today or the next puc meeting but i hope that's the plan, the framework of the pla
of consultation in the international regulators, canada, australia, japan, europe etc. and we continue to work the issue. i would say with banks registering the largest banks registered in the term, we are going to have more issues to sort through and we are committed to soaring through -- >> you are not talking of those that registered when you are making that statement. just the firms that register. >> but i have some expressions from some of the foreign regulators that they feel like some of the guidance may be in conflict with their loan regulator, their own that regulation and i guess that is what i am saying. if they are in conflict how are you dealing with those conflicts? >> the one example was in japan they have a clearing requirement. they actually put in place november 1st and we now have a requirement that we finished in november. there is a conflict because we both say they have to be cleared and registered clearinghouses. yet they have yet to register the london clearing house and we have yet to register the japanese clearing house. we are relieved they can use the japanese clear
for david? >> well, no. i want to talk about japan. i know our audience is carrying a lot more these days about the fiscal cliff, but we've got another cliff of sorts coming up in japan, the electrics sunday. everyone is expecting that abe follows in the footsteps of mr. draghi and europe and mr. bernanke here in the u.s. we can more yen printing, that weakens the yen. maybe american investors can make some money in japanese stocks. i'd be curious where you think the election is going. does it matter? >> i think the world has more possibility that your pen might change course as far as monitoring fiscal policy after the elections. but the japanese realize when you play with fire, you might end up burning down the house. jgb's nine times tier one capital, if they're not careful, they can trigger a run on jgb and the house base comes tumbling down. so i think actually the next government is tokyo will be a lot more cautious. i think the market is -- >> so we can get another huge disappointment. so everyone thinks the dollar/yen is finally going to go up, you can make money on the yen short
's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. that makes watching tv even better. if your tv were a hot dog, zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french mustard. just like adding fancy mustard to a hotdog makes you go "woah!," zeebox adds video, info, and playalongs to spice up your favorite shows. download zeebox free and say "woah" every time you watch tv. >>> good friday morning, it's 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 p.m. on the west coast. taking a live look at new york city. take a look at that. >> unbelievable, we don't deserve it. back with us on set, richard wolfe, dand donnie deutsch. >> president o
. >> that is china, incorporated. >> the korette su from the '80s from japan, it is a powerhouse and it will be more on the world economic scene as we move forward. >> you know, the job creators, the 2%, they laugh at us over there. >> they don't laugh, they look at us warily, i think is more probably more appropriate. they also are taking steps in their banking system, we should point out. they've bailed out any bank, depositors have never failed to get their money. but they're trying to put in a -- according to "the new york times," at least, a deposit guarantee system as well for the banking system. >> sounds like all systems go there. >> we'll see if this continues next week. meantime, we'll talk apple debuting the iphone 5 in china today. the iphone news isn't preventing apple shares from falling in the market. cutting the price target to $700 from $780. he does maintain a buy rating and said apple needs to expand more geographically. it's not dead, it's not -- but it needs to find ways to innovate its products. we sort of saw this coming. steve had a caution note on apple a few weeks ago which
. >>> tokyo is, japan is the most expensive studio in the world. average cost for a movie ticket. $22. average cost for a beer. $10. manhattan ranks 36th. liz: is $10 high for a beer. david: not a manhattan bars. i've had a few $10 beers. but that is another story. liz: one of the important parts. health care act is creation of health care exchanges to help individuals get insurance if their employer didn't provide it. david: the clock has run out. today is the deadline for states to decide who will set up mandatory exchanges, the state or the federal government. peter barnes is in dewe with the story. >> that's right, david and liz. these health care exchanges are big part of obamacare. the administration is counting on them to provide coverage for 23 million people by 2016. but as of the deadline today, half of the states are create their own exchanges but 26 states will let the federal government set them up for them and six states will set them up in partnership with the feds in kind of tests here. now, some republican governors are passing on these because they opposed obamacare. others a
ask you about some other stuff. japan rising. europe stocks doing very well. china stocks having a bit of a comeback year. in other words, as a global guide, there are options to playing this fiscal cliff game here in new york. >> absolutely. you don't have to just trade the s&p 500. i mean, look at tonight, you're seeing australia up a third of a point. the japanese yen is doing very well. look at hong kong. if you want to take what the federal reserve did and apply it internationally, look at hong kong. their monetary policy is pegged to what the federal reserve does. but they have an inflation issue and their economy is tied to china. so if you buy something like ewh, the hong kong etf, all those stocks are priced in hong kong dollars. if the hong kong dollar is repegged, the ewh will go up as much as the repegging. >> what does that mean for the u.s. market? where are you on the u.s. market right now? >> you know, i think right now, probably to the end of year, if we can get some kind of movement on this fiscal cliff, you have a real potential for a pop, 3%, 4%, 5%. unfortunately,
-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the ed show." our next guest has a long history with the state of michigan. >> hi. i'm michael moore. in my hometown of flint, michigan general motors closed the factories and put 30,000 people out of work. to raise their spirits i made this movie. >> the protests we've seen in michigan lately probably got his attention. >> right to work is wrong! right to work is wrong! right to work is wrong! >> right to work is wrong! >> right to work is wrong! >> let's bring in academy award-winning filmmaker michael moore, who was born and raised in the great state of michigan. michael, good to have you on "the ed show." appreciate it. >> thanks for having me here, ed. >> is your blood boiling over this? >> well, yeah. i've been in a bit of a rage the last couple of days. my uncle was in the sit-down strike in flint 75 years ago this year. uncle vern. and our family and all the families of people i grew up with
, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. it's a car like no other... from a place like no other. introducing the all-new 2013 chevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> a meteorologist in louisiana loses her job after defending herself on facebook. rhonda lee joins me with her story. we'll be right back. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> and we are back. a handful of republicans are playing politics with the victims of hurricane sandy. they're refusing to fund disaster relief unless democrats offset the spending. these republicans probably didn't attend the 121212 concert last night. stars like bruce springsteen, bon jovi, and the rolling stones helped raise more than $35 million. now congress needs to do its part. the president is asking for $60 bill
, i think, was in japan where an individual went in with a knife and stabbed a number of children around this tender age too, but you normally don't see this, but we do see, unfortunately, about 20 mass shooting incidents which may well turn out to be. we'll see an average of 20 of these per year, and, unfortunately, that number doesn't go down, and at least this year it appears that it's gone up. >> clint, wnbc is reporting that there may be more bodies in the elementary school. essential this is an unfolding tragedy. i want to bring in our panel here, and also joining us on the phone -- sorry. joining me today in set in new york city, the golden strip, michael eric dyson, host of nbc, melissa harris perry from the nation, and ari melbourne, columnist for the washington post and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart. this is, unfortunately, something that is tha has happened a number of times this year. an ongoing national nightmare, these shootings that take place. i guess my first question is an unfolding situation. certainly we are getting more details there. there may be more b
get china exposure. europe, japan and the u.s. are all up 12% to 15% for the year. china's down
japan. this is a story that is being covered from around the world. >> unfortunately, chris, you and i know this is an american story, this ability to get access to semi-automatic weapons. people with sometimes mental deficiencies all coming together. i guess you'll throw to the press conference. it looks like we're starting. i'll do it right now. we're looking at a group of people which includes governor malloy of connecticut. we're going to get t
, in germany, in france, in south korea, in japan, all of whom have very strong gun control laws, you see that there are probably somewhere between maybe only a couple dozen to a couple hundred handgun related deaths a year. so we have a handgun vie -- a gun violence epidemic in this country that's unlike what is occurring anywhere else amongst our industrial counterparts, and you consider the arguments that the nra makes, the principal argument they have made to hold up legislation for 15 years is people need guns in their homes for self-defense. this has been studied by countless study all of which have found the same thing. guns inside the home are used very, very frequently, a tiny percentage of instances. almost all the times when guns inside a home are used, they are used in a suicide or in a homicide or some other kind of assault. and i remember when we were trying to get gun violence legislation passed in the wake of columbine. i remember being invited to meet with president clinton inside the oval office, and he said to me as we were walking out the door that day, he said, you kn
on the planet. the top four healthiest countries for men are japan followed by singapore, swins land and spain. the u.s. is tied with norway for 29th place. japan tops the list for women, followed by south korea, spain, and singapore. u.s. women finished 33rd in the tie with astona. >> we have to get ahead of astonia. >> all right. barbara streisand talking romance and politics with piers morgan. the hollywood icon says she's never been in love with a republican and never could be. she's a big president obama supporter and says the one thing that makes her proudest is his support for women and barbara streisand has a particular woman in mind to succeed the president. >> well, we're one of the last countries to ever think of having a woman be president. but i think that's possible now. but it wasn't years ago. >> do you think hillary is likely to run? >> i don't know but i hope after a four-year rest that she would run because she would be a great woman president. >> piers asked barbara streisand to name the greatest actor she's ever seen. her answer, marlon brando. good pick. >> i would say so
central bank. that's not fannie and freddie- like but still has a government backdrop. japan, australia, rbs is part of their markets. that gets you back to where the u.s. is now. you have an outstanding mortgage stock in the united states. some of this data is a little bit dated from 2012. but it gives you some snapshots about where the delinquencies are. something like a quarter have an underwater nature to the mortgage. there are still some challenges outstanding in the markets. where is the credit going to come back into the system outside of the fanny-freddie model? there are lots of calls. you hear from jeb hensarling. fannie and freddie and the fha have to be drawn back in some way. how do you do that? this provides at least some of the basic high points of where is it that the private capital is going to come from. if you have a pension fund, you put that money into the u.s. housing stock market. do you lend that to borrower? do you want to loan money to uy a house?% to by hous the government may be doing that. the private markets say they will put the money somewhere else. kind
. about to go in recession. japan raising taxes. why in the world we would apply that poison to ourselves. lori: that is the ultimatum from the white house, as you know. because of the president's reelection they have the leverage. so are the republicans going to have any choice but to cave especially on the issue of raising taxes for higher-income americans? >> well, there are small business owners. 63 percent, and people who create capitol, invest capital. we have seen in europe and france especially, that kind of thing does not work. he does not have a mandate to hurt the economy which is the way the republicans should phrase this thing. why harm the economy now. lori: edges of the economy fall off the cliff to iraq or raising the tax on the wealthy. >> with the republicans should do, making the point they're raising taxes is a bad thing to do, let's postpone this bank. better to do that than to give poison to the patient now. our economy is starting to slow again. give people pause. when you do things in a rush to do things you don't anticipate. lori: our viewers know that you ran twi
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a government backdrop. japan, australia, rbs is part of their markets. that gets you back to where the u.s. is now. you have an outstanding mortgage stock in the united states. some of this data is a little bit dated from 2012. but it gives you some snapshots about where the delinquencies are. something like a quarter have an underwater nature to the mortgage. there are still some challenges outstanding in the markets. where is the credit going to come back into the system outside of the fanny-freddie model? there are lots of calls. you hear from jeb hensarling. fannie and freddie and the fha have to be drawn back in some way. how do you do that? this provides at least some of the basic high points of where is it that the private capital is going to come from. if you have a pension fund, you put that money into the u.s. housing stock market. do you lend that to borrower? do you want to loan money to people at 4% to buy a house? the government may be doing that. the private markets say they will put the money somewhere else. kind of japanese product. the liquidity it moves pretty quickly.
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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